Monday, 23 May 2011

What's the point-ism

I have been assailed once again, by the dark dogs of What's-the-Point-ism.  I think it happens pretty regularly to any Edinburgh-based musician.  Despite some people saying some very nice things about one's music, it usually adds up to only a handful of people, and one yearns for a chance to reach a wider audience.  And, in that attempt, most people will simply ignore you.

A dark dog of What's the Point-ism
Which, as Matthew from Song By Toad would say, you shouldn't take personally.  Which is good advice, but not so easy to do when it's your stuff that's being ignored.

One is reminded of a story told me by Kat Flint, related by the musicians in the Cara Dillon band (whom she toured with).  They apparently said that if they were in a strange town/city and were bored, they would go to music nights and pretend they were A & R men from some big record label, just as a jolly jape.  They said Edinburgh was the only place where no-one ever believed them.

Pfft.  Going to band practice, hopefully that will shift this mood.

7 comments:

  1. True we all want to be heard, understood and loved but doing it for its own sake is the thing. I'd like to say something zen and clever at this point but remember a person is clever people are stupid.

    ReplyDelete
  2. An interesting point, Ms Fi. I'd actually settle for just being heard, and responded to right now. Even if it was to say "I listened to your music, and it's not my thing" would be a huge leap forward than the emptiness of a VOID!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. maybe you should get out more and play more?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well, I can do that with my own music easily enough, I was really talking about the band, and how it would be nice for more people to at least have the option of hearing the Storm's album. Playing live is one thing, but my point was really that it's hard to get anyone to take any interest in any recordings. Reviews, airplay, features in mags, that kind of thing.

    ReplyDelete
  5. You need to sign up to a good PR agency and pay them some cash...

    Next thing you know, stories about you (if you don't actually have any, they can make them up) will be in papers, magazines and being mentioned on the radio...

    Then, people might play your songs, listeners might like them...

    Sadly, that's the ONLY way you'll ever play to more than the proverbial three men and a dog...

    I've been banging on about this for years Nelson, as you may recall from the days of the OOTB message board...

    Of course, I have never spent a single penny on PR, stupidly believing that, because my music is actually rather good (if I say so myself) sooner or later (it seems very much later, possibly not before I die) I will be "discovered", purely by chance and completely on merit, by the masses and they will adore me and buy my music...

    At present I am fine with quite a few people from all over the world downloading my work for free (since I don't rely on music for my livelihood - heaven help those who do) or paying for the hand made musical artefacts which are my albums and singles...

    Just my oft repeated and always ignored two cents worth...

    this from a recent post on my blog "Cloudland Blue"...

    "Without PR you get nowhere...

    This a recent quote on a blog by Rowan Collinson, a "producer" on BBC Radio 6

    "I try to go to a couple of gigs a week to see what's out there and make my own judgement on bands who (sic) music PRs have 'plugged' to me."...

    Subtext? Don't even bother trying to get on the radio if you don't have PR...

    Sad..."

    Anyway, sorry for wittering on - keep blogging big man!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. All valid points Mr CBQ, sadly. That is a chilling subtext indeed. Just as well we've got the day jobs, eh?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Indeed - if you want to be a musician, be a plumber...

    ReplyDelete